Skip to main content
National Parks.

Alaska, Colorado, Virginie, Wyoming, Caroline du Sud, Californie, Utah, Washington, Floride

20 paysages incroyables des parcs nationaux américains

Par : Hal Amen

1 of 1
  • States:
    Alaska
    Colorado
    Virginie
    Wyoming
    Caroline du Sud
    Californie
    Utah
    Washington
    Floride

Les 59 parcs nationaux des États-Unis vous offriront plus qu'un aperçu de la géologie et de l'écologie de notre planète

Les Américains et tous ceux qui se rendent aux États-Unis peuvent visiter jusqu'à 59 parcs nationaux différents, dont les caractéristiques et les possibilités réunies sont bien plus diversifiées que celles de n'importe quelle autre région du monde. Des sommets enneigés de la chaîne de montagne Brooks dans le parc Gates of the Artics aux zones humides subtropicales des Everglades en Floride. De la chaleur étouffante de la Vallée de la Mort en Californie à la fraîche brume des sommets de Shenandoah, en Virginie. Des glaciers aux mangroves, des chutes d'eau aux canyons ou encore du désert aux forêts d'arbres majestueux, les 59 parcs nationaux des États-Unisvous offriront plus qu'un aperçu de la géologie et de l'écologie de notre planète. Certains noms de parcs vous sont peut-être familiers. D'autres vous sont probablement inconnus. Mais qu'ils soient visités par dix millions de personnes par an (parc Great Smoky) ou par à peine mille personnes (parc de Kobuk Valley), chacun d'entre eux mérite le détour. Voici quelques suggestions pour vous aider à préparer votre voyage.

Parc National de Wrangell-Saint-Élie

Many of these park names may be familiar to you. Some you may be hearing for the first time. But whether they see 10 million annual visitors (Great Smoky) or barely a 1,000 (Kobuk Valley), all are worth a trip. Here’s some inspiration to get you planning. Wrangell–St. Elias National Park

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park

NPS Photo - Neal Herbert

Aerial Photo from Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve

The largest park in the country, Wrangell-St. Elias lies in a corner of southern Alaska, adjacent to the Yukon's Kluane National Park just over the border. Its 20,000 square miles make for a whole lot of potential exploration; pictured above is a hiker on the Skookum Volcano Trail.

Canyonlands National Park

John Fowler

Canyonlands National Park

Just south of Moab and the more recognized Arches National Park, Canyonlands also features some impressive sandstone arch formations, as well as canyons of monumental scale, carved by the Colorado and Green Rivers.

Shenandoah National Park

Josh Grenier

Shenandoah National Park

Encompassing a long strip of both the Blue Ridge Mountains and adjacent Shenandoah River Valley, this Virginia national park gets super popular during the fall, when leaf peepers arrive to complete the 105-mile Skyline Drive.

Yellowstone National Park

The world's first national park is also one of its most unique and well visited. The 3,400 square miles of Yellowstone hold geysers, mountain lakes, forests, river canyons, waterfalls, and many threatened species. Above is an aerial shot of the Grand Prismatic Spring, the third-largest hot spring in the world.

Congaree National Park

Congaree National Park

I had honestly never heard of this park prior to researching this piece, but after reading up, I totally want to go. Congaree protects a vast tract of marshy hardwood forest along the river of the same name just southeast of Columbia, South Carolina. Its old-growth cypress trees are some of the tallest in the American East.

Death Valley National Park

Death Valley National Park

Low and hot—Death Valley is home to both the lowest elevations and hottest temperatures in the US. But the landscape in this part of California is actually incredibly diverse, ranging from saltpans like the Devil's Racetrack, pictured above, to snow-capped mountains reaching 11,000ft.

Bryce Canyon National Park

Bruce Canyon National Park

Bryce sits in southern Utah and features a massive collection of natural amphitheaters covered in rock formations known as hoodoos.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Great Smoky is surrounded by kitschy tourist towns and is the most visited national park, thanks to its location near the East Coast and free admission. Still, once you're there, you can see scenes like this.

Grand Teton National Park

Grand Teton National Park

Named for the largest of its three signature peaks, Grand Teton National Park also contains lakes, forest, and a section of the Snake River. It sits just south of Yellowstone in western Wyoming, and together they represent one of the largest protected ecosystems in the world.

Olympic National Park

Covering nearly a million acres on the peninsula of the same name in northwestern Washington, the terrain of this park is super variable, ranging from Pacific coastline to alpine peaks to temperate rainforest.

Great Sand Dunes National Park

Great Sand Dunes National Park

One of the country's newest national parks (designated in 2004), Great Sand Dunes lies in the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado. Featuring the tallest sand dunes on the continent, backed by multiple 13,000ft mountains, this is also one of the few places in the country where you can try sandboarding.

Yosemite National Park

Yosemite National Park

The central draw of Yosemite is the 7-square-mile valley of the same name, with its glacially carved peaks, sequoia groves, and spectacular waterfalls. To beat the crowds, get out and explore some of the other areas in this massive park in the Eastern Sierras.

Arches National Park

This aptly named park in eastern Utah, just north of Moab, is home to some 2,000 sandstone arches that come in all shapes and sizes. Above is one of the most photographed, Delicate Arch.

Glacier Bay National Park

Glacier Bay National Park

There are no roads leading to this park in southeastern Alaska, so your choices for getting there are: by raft via the Tatshenshini and Alsek Rivers (from Canada), by plane (usually out of Juneau), or, most commonly, by cruise ship.

Kings Canyon National Park

Kings Canyon National Park

Like Sequoia National Park next door, Kings Canyon is home to some seriously massive trees. Seen above is a stout ponderosa pine on the Bubbs Creek Trail.

Big Bend National Park

Expansive desert plains, 7,800ft mountains, and high Rio Grande canyons (Santa Elena Canyon shown above) define Big Bend National Park in western Texas. It's also distinguished as an International Dark Sky Park, marking it a great place for stargazing.

Denali National Park

Denali National Park

As far as views from the visitor center go, this one is pretty spectacular. The 6 million acres of Denali, in central Alaska, include the highest section of the Alaska Range (with the peak that gives the park its name), glaciers, river valleys, and abundant wildlife such as grizzly bears, caribou, gray wolves, golden eagles, wolverines, and Dall sheep.

Everglades National Park

Jupiterimages

Aerial view of Florida Everglades

Preserving one of the most significant wetland ecosystems anywhere in the world, southern Florida's Everglades protect rare species such as the Florida panther and American crocodile. The water in the park is actually an enormous river that runs from Lake Okeechobee to Florida Bay at a speed of about a quarter mile per day.

Gates of the Arctic National Park

NPS Photo

Remote river in Gates of the Arctic

As its name suggests, this is the northernmost park in the US, and is also one of the largest. Its predominant geographic feature is the Brooks Range. With zero road access, you have to hike or fly in, but once there, you've got pretty much an endless list of wilderness hiking and camping options.

Grand Canyon National Park

For the past several million years, the Colorado River has been slowly but steadily grinding its way through the rock of the Colorado Plateau in northern Arizona. Reaching a width of 18 miles and a depth of 6,000 feet, the Grand Canyon is on a scale of few other places on Earth.

Photo aérienne du Parc national et réserve de Wrangell-Saint-Élie

Photo aérienne du Parc national et réserve de Wrangell-Saint-Élie
En savoir plus
National Parks Service/Neal Herbert

Parc National de Canyonlands

Juste au sud de Moab et non loin du très célèbre parc national des Arches, se trouve le parc national de Canyonlands. Il offre également au visiteur le spectacle des arches en grès, ainsi que de gigantesques canyons, sculptés par le fleuve Colorado et son affluent, la Green River.

Parc national de Canyonlands

Parc national de Canyonlands
En savoir plus
John Fowler

Parc National de Shenandoah

S’étendant sur une longue bande de la chaîne de montagnes Blue Ridge ainsi que sur la vallée de la rivière Shenandoah, ce parc national de Virginie est très populaire en automne lorsque les touristes parcourent la Skyline Drive, route longue de  169 kilomètres, pour admirer les nuances rubescentes des feuilles.

Parc national de Shenandoah

Parc national de Shenandoah
En savoir plus
Josh Grenier

Parc National de Yellowstone

Le premier parc national au monde est également l'un des plus visités et des plus impressionnants. Au sein de ses 8 900 kilomètres carrés, Yellowstone abrite des geysers, des lacs de montagne, des forêts, des canyons, des cascades, ainsi que de nombreuses espèces menacées. Ci-dessus, une vue aérienne de la Grand Prismatic  Spring, troisième plus grande source d'eau chaude au monde.

Parc National de Congaree

Honnêtement, avant de faire des recherches pour cet article, je n'avais jamais entendu parler de ce parc. Mais à présent, je veux absolument y aller. Le parc de Congaree protège une vaste étendue de forêt marécageuse de feuillus le long du fleuve du même nom, juste au sud de Columbia, en Caroline du Sud. Ses vieux cyprès sont parmi les plus hauts de la côte est des États-Unis.

Parc national de Congaree

Parc national de Congaree
En savoir plus

Parc National de la Vallée de la Mort

La Vallée de la Mort est connue pour battre tous les records avec les altitudes les plus basses et les températures les plus élevées des États-Unis. Mais les paysages de cette partie de la Californie sont très diversifiés. On y trouve des marais salants comme ceux de Devil's Racetrack, la photo ci-dessus, ainsi que des sommets enneigés qui culminent à plus de 3 000 mètres.

Parc national de la Vallée de la Mort

Parc national de la Vallée de la Mort
En savoir plus

Parc National de Bryce Canyon

Le parc de Bryce se trouve au sud de l'Utah et se caractérise par de nombreux amphithéâtres naturels recouverts de formations rocheuses appelées les « cheminées de fée ».

Parc national de Bryce Canyon

Parc national de Bryce Canyon
En savoir plus
Tobias Haase (paraflyer.de)

Parc National des Great Smoky Mountains

Great Smoky est entouré de villes touristiques au charme kitsch. Sa proximité avec la côte est ainsi que la gratuité de son accès en font le parc national le plus visité des États-Unis. Une fois sur place, vous pourrez admirer des paysages de ce genre.

Parc national des Great Smoky Mountains

Parc national des Great Smoky Mountains
En savoir plus

Parc National de Grand Teton

Tirant son nom du plus haut des trois pics qui ont fait sa réputation, Grand Teton abrite des lacs, des forêts ainsi qu'une partie de la rivière Snake. Il se situe juste au sud de Yellowstone, dans l'ouest du Wyoming, et les deux parcs réunis constituent l'un des plus grands écosystèmes protégés au monde.

Parc national de Grand Teton

Parc national de Grand Teton
En savoir plus

Parc National Olympique

Avec près de quatre millions de kilomètres carrés sur la péninsule du même nom, dans le nord-ouest de Washington, le terrain de ce parc offre une diversité de paysages surprenante, des paysages côtiers sur le Pacifique aux pics enneigés en passant par une forêt ombrophile tempérée.

Parc National de Great Sand Dunes

Great Sand Dunes se trouve dans la vallée de San Luis, au sud du Colorado. Il est l’un des parcs nationaux du pays les plus récents (créé en 2004). Avec les plus hautes dunes de sable du continent, entourées par plusieurs montagnes de plus de 4 000 mètres d'altitude, ce parc est également l'un des rares endroits du pays où vous pourrez pratiquer le sandboard.

Parc national de Great Sand Dunes

Parc national de Great Sand Dunes
En savoir plus

Parc National de Yosemite

Le centre d’intérêt du parc de Yosemite est sa vallée de 18 kilomètres carrés portant le même nom, avec ses pics creusés par les glaciers, ses bosquets de séquoias et ses cascades spectaculaires. Pour éviter la foule, sortez des sentiers battus et explorez d'autres zones de ce parc gigantesque des Sierras orientales.

Parc national de Yosemite

Parc national de Yosemite
En savoir plus

Parc National des Arches

Ce parc de l'est de l'Utah, juste au nord de Moab et qui porte très bien son nom, est le sanctuaire de quelque 2 000 arches de grès de toutes formes et tailles. Ci-dessus, l'une des plus photographiées, l'Arche Delicate.

Parc National de Glacier Bay

Aucune route ne mène à ce parc du sud-est de l’Alaska. Pour vous y rendre, vous avez le choix entre : un zodiaque passant sur les rivières Tatshenshini et Alsek (depuis le Canada), l'avion (généralement depuis Juneau), ou le bateau de croisièrequi est le plus fréquemment utilisé.

Parc national de Glacier Bay

Parc national de Glacier Bay
En savoir plus

Parc National de Kings Canyon

À l’instar du parc national de Sequoia, Kings Canyon abrite des arbres gigantesques. Ci-dessus, un imposant pin ponderosa sur le sentier Bubbs Creek Trail.

Parc national de Kings Canyon

Parc national de Kings Canyon
En savoir plus

Parc National de Big Bend

De vastes plaines désertiques, des montagnes de 2 300 mètres ainsi que les hauts canyons du Rio Grande (ci-dessus, Santa  Elena  Canyon) sont autant d’atouts du parc national de Big Bend dans l'ouest du Texas. Il est également reconnu comme réserve internationale de ciel étoilé,lieu privilégié pour l'astronomie.

Parc National de Denali

Le panorama visible depuis le centre d’accueil vaut à lui seul le détour. Les 24 000 kilomètres carrés de Denali, au centre de l’Alaska, comprennent la plus haute partie de la chaîne de l’Alaska (y compris le pic qui donne son nom au parc), des glaciers, des vallées fluviales, ainsi qu’une faune exubérante, tels des ours grizzlis, des caribous, des loups gris, des aigles royaux, des carcajous et des mouflons de Dall.

Parc national de Denali

Parc national de Denali
En savoir plus

Parc National des Everglades

Les Everglades de la Floride du sud préservent l'un des écosystèmes de zones humides les plus importants au monde et sont le sanctuaire d'espèces en danger comme la panthère de Floride et le crocodile américain. L'eau du parc est en réalité un fleuve gigantesque qui relie le lac Okeechobee à la baie de Floride.

Vue aérienne des Everglades en Floride

Vue aérienne des Everglades en Floride
En savoir plus
Jupiter Images

Parc National Gates of the Arctic

Comme son nom l’indique, ce parc se situe le plus au nord des États-Unis. Il est également l'un des plus étendus. La chaîne Range constitue la principale attraction touristique. Sans accès direct par la route, vous pouvez l’atteindre à pied ou par les airs. Une fois sur place, de nombreuses possibilités s’offrent à vous : des randonnées pédestres au camping, vous n'aurez que l'embarras du choix.

Rivière dans les Gates of the Arctic

Rivière dans les Gates of the Arctic
En savoir plus
National Parks Service

Parc National du Grand Canyon

Depuis plusieurs millions d'années, le fleuve Colorado creuse sa route, lentement mais régulièrement, à travers la roche du Plateau du Colorado dans le nord de l'Arizona. Avec une largeur pouvant atteindre 28 kilomètres et une profondeur de 2 000 mètres, le Grand Canyon n'a quasiment pas d'équivalent sur Terre.

Thèmes associés :